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A Little Bit About Framing

Olivia in blue on yellow couch

Dear Friends:

The world of framing often leaves the consumer at a disadvantage.  The problem always arises from too little knowledge and too little money.  Quality framing is expensive.  Good framers who follow the “quality” rules are often hard to find.  The factors involved in protecting your artwork range from acidity to humidity.  

In warm climates, paper art swells.  Images that are created too close to the edge of the paper leave little room for proper placement under the mat to secure the paper from slipping out of its matting.  Paper artists need to be sure to leave plenty of margin for this not to be a concern.  In addition, acid migration from adjacent materials is a common source of damage to paper.

Over the years, chemically unstable materials used for framing take their toll. These materials include many of the cardboards, tapes, and adhesives used to mount artifacts before framing. In addition, wood frames contribute to the deterioration of paper.  Framing is supposed to protect, but if not done properly, it will cause damage instead.  

Unfortunately, cost is always a factor.  Museum level framing is the best, but is always the most expensive.

          • Museum Level framing should give the best possible protection for your artwork 

          • Museum Level Framing actually exceeds the definition of Preservation Framing established by the Library of Congress years ago. 

           • Conservation or Preservation Framing is the BARE MINIMUM that a frame shop should follow in their use of materials and techniques. 

To Museum Quality Frame:

• Use 100% Museum Rag mat board to frame the outside of the image. (1)

• Use 100% Museum Grade Cotton Rag Backing 4-Ply to attach the artwork to. (1)

• The Glass or Acrylic you select is referred to as “glazing” in the framing world.  It should consist of a minimum of 98% UV filtering properties. (1)

• Museum Quality Hinges: Non-adhesive hinging (e.g., photo/mounting corners; polyethylene strapping; mounting strips) whenever possible or Japanese tissue hinges applied with refined wheat starch paste Hinges must be attached with an adhesive that is nonstaining, permanent, and reversible. Conservators recommend homemade starch-based paste. For more specific information on matting and sources of materials, see the NEDCC leaflet “How to Do Your Own Matting and Hinging.” Hinges are usually applied to the top corners of the artifact, although with larger or heavy sheets, additional hinges may be added at other points along the top edge. If the object is to be “floated” (displayed with the edges exposed), additional hinges at the bottom corners or along the other three edges are desirable. (2)

• For added protection, the frame should be sealed, and there should be at least one additional layer of sturdy archival board behind the one on which the object is mounted. This backing layer, for physical and thermal protection should be an all-paper, lignin-free board. This is preferable to wood or foam board, which may release chemicals as they age. For even greater protection, a moisture barrier should be inserted between the backing sheets or attached to the back of the frame with 3M double-sided tape #415. Four- or five-mil Melinex can be used as a moisture barrier, although Marvelseal®, a laminate of aluminum foil and inert plastic, is even better since it is more impermeable to both moisture and gases. (2)

• The final board layer should be covered with an archival paper dust cover attached to the back of the frame with framer’s sealing tape or double-sided tape. Another possibility is to make a sandwich of the contents (glazing, mat, object, and backing layers) and seal the edges with tape. The sandwich is then placed in the frame as a unit and held in place with hardware. (2)

• Museum Quality Hinges: Non-adhesive hinging (e.g., photo/mounting corners; polyethylene strapping; mounting strips) whenever possible or Japanese tissue hinges applied with refined wheat starch paste 

• Frame: metal or wood (if wood, rabbet should be lined with a barrier film (e.g., aluminum or polyester tape with acrylic adhesive) to prevent acids in wood from moving into the mat package); of sufficient depth to accommodate the complete package including the backing board; constructed to minimize potential for warping, bowing, torquing

• For added protection, the frame should be sealed, and there should be at least one additional layer of sturdy archival board behind the one on which the object is mounted. This backing layer, for physical and thermal protection should be an all-paper, lignin-free board.

• The final board layer should be covered with an archival paper dust cover attached to the back of the frame with framer’s sealing tape or double-sided tape.

For Conservation or Preservation Quality Framing: (10)

• Use All Chemically stable materials Matboard (for window and for backmat)

• 100% cotton rag or chemically purified, lignin-free wood pulp stock; pH-neutral or slightly alkaline (pH 8.5); -4-ply minimum; over-matting provides more protection than “floating” in the window.

• Hinges: Non-adhesive hinging (e.g., photo/mounting corners; polyethylene strapping; mounting strips) whenever possible or Japanese tissue hinges applied with refined wheat starch paste

• Tape for hinging the window and backmat together: Water-activated gummed linen tape; object should not touch linen tape

• Glazing: UV-opaque acrylic (also available as anti-static for objects with friable media); ensure the object does not touch the glazing — use a sufficiently thick-ply window mat or add spacers along the perimeter of the mat

• Backing board: acid-free and lignin-free corrugated board (necessitates an additional moisture barrier) or corrugated polyethylene or polypropylene; at least 3 mm thick 

• Moisture barrier: metalized polyester film; polyester film 

• Frame: metal or wood (if wood, rabbet should be lined with a barrier film (e.g., aluminum or polyester tape with acrylic adhesive) to prevent acids in wood from moving into the mat package); of sufficient depth to accommodate the complete package including the backing board; constructed to minimize potential for warping, bowing, torquing

• Method for securing mat package in frame: pins or brads; no tape

Acrylic is preferred over glass.  It is lighter in weight and won’t shatter. It is half the weight of glass. It is stronger and more impact resistant. Use acrylic for hanging and shipping heavy oversized artwork, in children’s rooms, in earthquake zones, in high traffic areas or anywhere where safety is a concern.

There are two major brands of Acrylic:

1.  Optium Acrylic® from Tru Vue –  It is the state-of-the-art glazing. It is virtually invisible anti-reflective coating allowing viewers to see the finest details in crystal clear color neutrality, while its UV-filtering, abrasion resistant acrylic, and anti-static coating offer uncompromising protection and preservation.  There are four options with the Optium product:  (1) (3) (4)

1. Optium Museum Acrylic® –  5* Rating

  • Blocks up to 99% UV radiation
  • Clear, hard coat abrasion resistant, UV filtering extruded acrylic
  • Light Reflection/Double-sided Anti-Reflection Haze – <1.5%
  • Anti-reflective, anti-static, UV protection and light transmission remain unchanged after 2000 hours (estimated to be approximately 100 years)  of Q-sun Xenon arc testing at exposure intensity of 100,000 Lux.
  • Applications: 
  1. Framing Pastels and Graphite artwork because of its anti-static environment.
  2. Framing Large Oversized Works of Art
  3. Framing Three Dimensional Art
  4. Framing Irreplaceable Works of Art: Original Watercolor, Oil, Acrylic, Gouache
  5. High traffic areas
  6. Brightly lit areas
  7. Framing or display cases for cultural heritage and fine art collections
  8. Traveling exhibits
  9. Shadowboxes for displaying objects, including family heirlooms or personal mementos
  10. Framing for earthquake prone or high traffic areas where safety is a concern
  11. To Clean Optium Museum Acrylic® : Spray a small amount of ammonia-free glass cleaner onto a clean micro-fiber cloth or a soft, lint-free cloth. To prevent overspray, do not spray cleaner directly on the acrylic.  Do not use an acrylic cleaner on this product. Do not use cloths that have been washed with fabric softener and/or dried in the dryer with fabric softener sheets. o not use coarse or abrasive cleaning agents or dirty cloths. Do not buff scratches in this product as it may damage the anti-reflective coating.  Cleaning with harsh chemicals such as ammonia can be harmful to your customers valued pieces.  Ammonia can cause out-gassing within the framing package.

2. Optium® Acrylic  –  4* Rating

  • Blocks up to 93% UV radiation
  • Clear, hard coat abrasion resistant extruded acrylic
  • Light Reflection/Double-sided Anti-Reflection Haze – <1.5%
  • Anti-reflective, anti-static, UV protection and light transmission remain 
  •     unchanged after 2000 hours (estimated to be approximately 100 years) 
  •     of Q-sun Xenon arc testing at exposure intensity of 100,000 Lux.
  • Durable hard coat protects against scratches
  • Shatter resistance safeguards against injury and damage to artwork
  • Proprietary coating is engineered for permanence 
  • Applications:
  1. Framing or displaying cultural heritage and fine art collections
  2. Static sensitive materials including textiles charcoals and pastels, and oversized works
  3. When the lighting environment is controlled to limit UV exposure
  4. Framing for earthquake prone or high traffic areas where safety is a concern
  5. To Clean Optium® Acrylic: Cleans like glass – no special acrylic cleaners needed.  Spray a small amount of ammonia-free glass cleaner onto a clean micro-fiber cloth or a soft, lint-free cloth. To prevent overspray, do not spray cleaner directly on the acrylic.  Do not use an acrylic cleaner on this product. Do not use cloths that have been washed with fabric softener and/or dried in the dryer with fabric softener sheets.  Do not use coarse or abrasive cleaning agents or dirty cloths. Do not buff scratches in this product as it may damage the anti-reflective coating.  Cleaning with harsh chemicals such as ammonia can be harmful to your customers valued pieces.  Ammonia can cause out-gassing within the framing package.

3. StaticShield® Acrylic –  4* Rating

  • Blocks up to 99% UV radiation
  • Clear, hard coat abrasion resistant, UV filtering extruded acrylic.
  • Light Reflection/Double-sided Anti-Reflection Haze – 8%
  • Anti-reflective, anti-static, UV protection and light transmission remain 
  •     unchanged after 2000 hours (estimated to be approximately 100 years) 
  •     of Q-sun Xenon arc testing at exposure intensity of 100,000 Lux.
  • Proprietary coating is engineered for permanence
  • Applications:
  1. Framing or displaying cultural heritage and fine art collections.
  2. Traveling  exhibits.
  3. Static sensitive materials including lightweight papers, textiles, charcoals, and pastels.
  4. Oversized works.
  5. Irreplaceable works of art,  family heirlooms or personal mementos.
  6. Framing for earthquake prone or high traffic areas where safety is a concern.
  7. To Clean StaticShield® Acrylic:  Cleans like glass – no special acrylic cleaners needed. Spray a small amount of ammonia-free glass cleaner onto a clean micro-fiber cloth or a soft, lint-free cloth. To prevent overspray, do not spray cleaner directly on the acrylic.  Do not use an acrylic cleaner on this product. Do not use cloths that have been washed with fabric softener and/or dried in the dryer with fabric softener sheets.  Do not use coarse or abrasive cleaning agents or dirty cloths. Do not buff scratches in this product as it may damage the anti-reflective coating.  Cleaning with harsh chemicals such as ammonia can be harmful to your customers valued pieces.  Ammonia can cause out-gassing within the framing package.

4. Conservation Clear® Acrylic –  2* Rating

  • Blocks up to 99% UV radiation. 
  • Crystal Clear UV filtering extruded acrylic.
  • Light Reflection/Double-sided Anti-Reflection Haze – 8%
  • Anti-reflective, anti-static, UV protection and light transmission remain unchanged after 2000 hours (estimated to be approximately 100 years) of Q-sun Xenon arc testing at exposure intensity of 100,000 Lux.
  • Shatter resistance safeguards against injury and damage to artwork.
  • Applications:
  1. Framing or displaying cultural heritage and fine art collections. 
  2. Oversized works.
  3. Irreplaceable works of art.
  4. Framing for earthquake prone or high traffic areas where safety is a concern.
  5. To Clean Conservation Clear® Acrylic:  Use an acrylic cleaner and a clean damp cleaning cloth.  Spray rag first.  Apply only light pressure, rinse with clean water or a cleaner designed specifically for acrylic, and dry by blotting with a clean, damp cloth or chamois.  Do not use cloths that have been washed with fabric softener and/or dried in the dryer with fabric softener sheets.  Do not use dry or gritty cloths, as they may cause surface scratches and create a static electric charge on the surface.  Do not use glass cleaning sprays, kitchen scouring compounds or solvents such as acetone, gasoline or lacquer to clean acrylic. Cleaning with harsh chemicals such as ammonia can be harmful to your customers valued pieces.  Ammonia can cause out-gassing within the framing package.

 2.  ACRYLITE acrylic sheet from Evonik(CYRO)/Tru Vu. (5) (6) (7)(8)(9)(10)

Guaranteed to be defect free, ACRYLITE® acrylic glazing products are manufactured to more stringent specifications than standard acrylic sheet, eliminating dirt and blemishes that could potentially produce imperfections when viewing framed artwork. ACRYLITE® sheet is half the weight of glass making it ideal for large or oversized pieces of art. Despite its light weight, ACRYLITE® sheet is many times more impact resistant than glass and provides increased protection against shattering and breakage. Not only is the art protected, but so are people in high traffic environments found in schools, institutions, and busy homes with active children. 

ACRYLITE® framing grade sheet is the only acrylic framing grade product that’s guaranteed defect free or your money back. It’s an exceptional general-purpose glazing for cherished memorabilia, photographs and prints as well as for valued artwork, and is used by museums and galleries for both indoor and outdoor framing. 

ACRYLITE offers three conservation grades that filter out 98% of damaging UV rays. They protect paper-borne artwork, photographs, prints and documents from fading, yellowing and brittling caused by UV light. Float glass and standard acrylic will filter only a small amount of UV. And, while UV glass requires a surface coating, ACRYLITE sheet’s UV protection is part of the structure of the sheet. It can’t scratch off. 

1.  UV Protection Acrylic (Tru Vu Conservation Clear): Acrylite OP-3

  • ACRYLITE OP-3 is designed for picture framers, museums, and artists. 
  • ACRYLITE OP-3 protects artwork and documents. 
  • ACRYLITE OP-3 filters out 98% of damaging ultraviolet rays, which is the major cause of fading and degradation. 
  • ACRYLITE OP-3 is clearer and more impact resistant than glass, and fabricates with the ease of acrylic. 
  • ACRYLITE OP-3 is available with an abrasion resistant surface on one side (AR1). 
  • Should you need to clean the acrylic sheet, use a clean, damp cleaning cloth, such as the 3M® Scotch-Brite® High Performance Cleaning Cloth. Apply only light pressure, rinse with clean water, and dry by blotting with a damp cloth or chamois. Dust the picture glazing with a soft , damp cloth or chamois. Dry or gritty cloths may cause surface scratches and create a static electric charge on the surface. Evonik’s line of ACRIFIX ™ acrylic cleaners and anti-static polishes can be purchased at www.acrylite-shop.com. For more information on ACRIFIX ™ products, visit www.acrifi x.com. Do not use window cleaning sprays, kitchen scouring compounds, or solvents such as acetone, gasoline, or lacquer thinner to clean acrylic.

tru-vue

A Note About Non-Glare:  Be Sure that you can view the image from every direction. Some no glare plexiglas® can be viewed only from standing directly in front of the art!!!!

2. Non Glare and UV Protection Acrylic (Tru Vu Conservation Reflection Control ): ACRYLITE OP3 P99

  • ACRYLITE OP3 P99 combines both non-glare and UV filtering characteristics. 
  • ACRYLITE OP3 P99 sheet was developed to meet the special needs of the picture frame industry. 
  • ACRYLITE OP3 P99 offers ultraviolet filtering, light weight, and ease of fabrication and has a matte-finish, non-glare surface. 
  • • Should you need to clean the acrylic sheet, use a clean, damp cleaning cloth, such as the 3M® Scotch-Brite® High Performance Cleaning Cloth. Apply only light pressure, rinse with clean water, and dry by blotting with a damp cloth or chamois. Dust the picture glazing with a soft , damp cloth or chamois. Dry or gritty cloths may cause surface scratches and create a static electric charge on the surface. Evonik’s line of ACRIFIX ™ acrylic cleaners and anti-static polishes can be purchased at www.acrylite-shop.com. For more information on ACRIFIX ™ products, visit www.acrifi x.com. Do not use window cleaning sprays, kitchen scouring compounds, or solvents such as acetone, gasoline, or lacquer thinner to clean acrylic.

3.  UV filtering and abrasion resistant. ACRYLITE AR OP-3 

  • ACRYLITE AR OP-3 is a conservation sheet. 
  • ACRYLITE AR OP-3 protects art from UV light 
  • ACRYLITE AR OP-3 protects itself from scratching and the abrasive effects of chemical cleaners. 
  • ACRYLITE AR OP-3 can be cleaned with common household cleaners like Windex ® or Glass Plus ®. Cleaning with harsh chemicals such as ammonia can be harmful to your customers valued pieces.  Ammonia can cause out-gassing within the framing package.
  • Note:  To clean acrylic or glass, use Windex® or Glass Plus®.  Never spray directly onto the glass of a framed artwork.  Spray onto a rag, then wipe the glass.

God bless.

OM

SUGGESTED FURTHER READING

  • Clapp, Anne F. Curatorial Care of Works of Art on Paper. New York: Nick Lyons Books, 1987.
  • Phibbs, Hugh. “Building Space Into the Frame” Picture Framing Magazine, Feb. 1995.
  • ___. “Preservation Matting for Works of Art on Paper,” Supplement to Picture Framing Magazine, Feb. 1997.
  • Smith, Merrily A. Matting and Hinging of Works of Art on Paper. Washington, D.C.:Library of Congress, 1981.

 

Many thanks to the following contributors to this page of information. Visit their sites and learn more about framing and acrylic® glazing.

  1. http://tru-vue.com/
  2. https://www.nedcc.org/free-resources/preservation-leaflets/4.-storage-and-handling/4.10-matting-and-framing-for-art-and-artifacts-on-paper
  3. http://tru-vue.com/solution/optium-museum-acrylic/
  4. http://tru-vue.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/TRU_5763_FactSheet_9_11x17.pdf
  5. http://www.acrylite.net/sites/dc/Downloadcenter/Evonik/Product/ACRYLITE/3034b-framing-with-acrylite.pdf
  6. http://www.acrylite.net/product/acrylite/en/products/acrylite/framing-grade/pages/Downloads.aspx
  7. http://www.acrylite.net/sites/dc/Downloadcenter/Evonik/Product/ACRYLITE/acrylite_for_picture_framing_glazing_brainshark.mp4 http://www.acrylite.net/product/acrylite/en/products/acrylite/non-glare/pages/default.aspx
  8. http://www.acrylite.net/product/acrylite/en/application-areas/conservation-glazing/museum/pages/default.aspx
  9. http://www.acrylite.net/product/acrylite/en/products/acrylite/uv-filtering/pages/default.aspx
  10. https://www.loc.gov/preservation/care/mat.html

 

UPCOMING CLASSES WITH OLIVIA

Olivia H&E ABOUT DSC7785

Academy of Botanical Artsm

Sarasota Studio 20 w/ OM Braida

2068 Sunnyside Lane, Sarasota, FL 34239

Open Registration – To Register, Call 941-953-9999

Thursdays – October 6,13, 20, and

Saturdays – October 8 and 22.

10:30am to 3:30pm

_______________________________

Academy of Botanical Artsm

Marie Selby Botanical Gardens w/ Olivia Braida

900 South Palm Avenue, Sarasota, FL 34236

Creating Botanical Art in

 

Selby’s Secret Garden: Part I

 

Wednesday to Friday

October 26 2016 to October 28 2016 ·

12:00pm –5:00pm

Learn – Explore – Create in this three-day art workshop. Students will be presented with a short slide presentation on the history of Botanical Art and the manner in which antique botanicals were created and composed. Students will then enjoy a trip through the Gardens as they learn the traditional skills of measuring, recording and working from field notes. Field sketches will be developed into fine drawings in this first of two three-day workshops. An Academy of Botanical Art Workshop.

Class Fee: $395 (Members $350) – Materials Fee: $35 (pay instructor)

To Register http://selby.org/events/event/creating-botanical-art-selbys-secret-garden-part/

Or Call Laura Avery 941-366-5731 x239

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